Once upon a time, when I was about 13 or so one of my then-friends came over with a movie to watch. ‘The Princess Bride‘ to be specific. I had never heard of it, didn’t necessarily think I’d enjoy it and was more hoping for ‘Pirates of the Caribean‘, because Orlando Bloom. Boy, I was wrong. I fell in love with the movie, but it took me about 14 years to realize it was a book as well. 

The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern’s Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure: The “Good Parts” Version Abridged by William Goldman. Quite a mouthful! In the book, Goldman pretends to be a fan of the book (as it has been read to him by his father, enlighting his interest in books and writing), who wants to inspire his son. He finds the book, gives it to his son who finds it very hard to read. As it turns out, Morgenstern has put a lot more in the book than his dad read to Goldman so he decides to abridge it, as a gift to his son.

The ending of a good book is like the ending of an era, you’re leaving friends behind and that can be hard. The last words can give some closure or be super frustrating.

You should go, she says. I’ll always be here. You know that.

(Sally Rooney – Normal People)

What defines a ‘normal person’? Is that when you have the same ideas and opinions as everyone at your high school, but then: what happens when you leave home and get out in the world? Or are you more normal when you’re unapologetically you, even if that means people don’t understand you?

The book is a story about love, but it’s not a romance. No prince or princess, and a whole lot of real world. It’s about growing up, leaving life as you knew behind and moving on, about fate and how to deal with that. I hadn’t heart about Sally Rooney before, but I saw a review of the book in a newspaper and it spiked my interest so I went out and bought it.

Weight: don’t want to know, Cigarettes: 0, alcohol unit consumed while reading this novel: 0, alcohol units needed while reading this novel: over 9000,  amount of moments putting down book to calm down: 5.

Typical  Bridget: clumsy, easily distracted and neurotic. Cooking spaghetti and the tv remote still proves to be hard, and now even harder with the distracting offered by two kids and twitter. When we left Bridget in the Edge of reason, we left with hope for a happy ending. Not just for Bridget, but for every person who’s desperately looking for a partner and a place in the world. Which didn’t happen and now she’s a 52-year-old widow with two kids and a mobile phone.

The ending of a good book is like the ending of an era, you’re leaving friends behind and that can be hard. The last words can give some closure or be super frustrating.

Inspired by ‘the unemployed philosophers guild‘, I’m starting a new series focussed on the last line of a book. So I’ll be sharing my favorite last line and explain a bit why I like them.

And I step up, into the darkness within; or else the light.

(Margaret Atwood – The handmaid’s tale)

Weight: undisclosed (scale broke), Cigarettes: 0, alcohol unit: 0 (still have to do job and keep said job), calories: +/- 0 before lunch (Intermittent fasting, luckily no calories in smell), excitement levels: HIGH.

BRIDGET IS BACK. DARCY IS BACK.

The Edge of Reason is based on Persuasion by Jane Austen and follows the basic storyline: Girl is in love but is convinced that they should not be/he wants to break up. This all goes down in the typical Bridged Jones way and with very little proper communication. (small disclosure:  have not yet read Persuasion…)

The ending of a good book is like the ending of an era, you’re leaving friends behind and that can be hard. The last words can give some closure or be super frustrating.

Inspired by ‘the unemployed philosophers guild‘, I’m starting a new series focussed on the last line of a book. So I’ll be sharing my favorite last line and explain a bit why I like them. Let’s start with my favorite book ever:

After all, tomorrow is another day.

(Margaret Mitchell – Gone with the wind)

Once upon a time, there were videotapes instead of DVDs. And places to rent those tapes, where my sister found ‘Bridget Jones Diary‘. Or maybe it was Edge of reason first, I don’t really remember. Anyway, we met Bridget Jones totally random and fell in love straight away.
Embarrassing detail: It took me about 10 years to realize that Bridget Jones is based on Pride and Prejudice. 

I pretty sure everybody knows who Bridget Jones is, even when all you know is that Bridget Jones is ‘that’ film. Which was amazing, Renee Zellweger will forever be Bridget Jones in my eyes. It was just too perfect. In short: Bridget Jones is about a woman in her thirties, who is very naive, funny and insecure. It takes places in the nineties when you could still smoke everywhere and there was no internet nor cell phones. Landlines were still very much used and there was no caller-id, but 1471 to check who called you last. Needless to say: it was used a lot in the book.

This will be the first out of a series of three, with next week Bridget Jones: Edge of reason!

I knew about Stephen King, I’m almost positive that I saw It when I was young (and I mean very young) and was scared of clowns for a while. A couple of years ago I got an e-reader and read ‘The long walk‘. After that, I barely thought about Stephen King or the fact he wrote books. Why? Not because I didn’t like ‘The long walk’, because I did. Horror, however, is normally not my genre. I once watched a movie about those snakes that rattle their tails and didn’t sleep for weeks. Turns out it was a comedy (does anyone know a comedy about rattlesnakes? All I remember is someone trying to be safe on top of a table, but the snake could climb as well).

Carrie is about a teenage girl,  faith and bullying. It shows how neglect, bullying and pushing your own ideas upon someone can have disastrous effects. Carrie‘s raised by her irrationally fanatic believing mother and because of their fanaticism in their faith, they’re outcasts and Carrie is bullied relentlessly. As result, Carrie is pushed to her limits and when pushed to your limits, extreme actions seem like the only possibility. And where have we seen that in (recent and not so recent) history?